Posts

The June 12 Vaudeville

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The "June 12 struggle" was an interesting period in Nigeria's history. The story of the struggle goes beyond the election that was annulled and its custodian. And the story of the election and the roles different personages and organisations played in the high drama starts well before the six-year democratic revolution unfurled with the annulment.  I've written a bit about this important, somewhat tragic, somewhat farcical, but none the less definitive moment in Nigeria's history. One of the two articles one might be interested in looking up are " Nigeria: the six year revolution " which which was first published in 2008 in the Working People's Vanguard and again in 2015 in the Socialist Worker . The other is " The shadow of June 12 : June 12, the left and Nigeria's democratic revolution", which was published in the Republic in 2022 and which has been republished in its latest special print issue "Nigeria Imaginary", marking t

"Tinubu's First Year in Office Undemocratic"*

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Could you give a brief assessment of the one year of President Bola Tinubu administration ? Tinubu himself gave the clearest perspective for appraising his administration at the so-called G20 compact with Africa economic conference in Berlin last November. Addressing German investors at conference, he boasted that he deserves the Guinness World Records recognition for neoliberal reforms.  Tinubu has been the most effective presidential tool of the capitalist class and imperialism in Nigeria’s history. That is why the IMF and rating agencies like Standard and Poor’s have showered him with praises. Under Tinubu’s watch, big capitalists and multinational corporations have been able to extend their capacity to exploit the working people and natural resources. Tinubu and his cronies are of course beneficiaries as well, as you can see with the award of the Lagos-Calabar superhighway contract. But poor working people and the already squeezed middle class have been the worse off. The remov

The 31st of May and Me

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May 31st is a day of utmost significance to me, in my personal and political life. And the two days of May 31st that defined me in fundamental ways were in the consecutive years of 1988 and 1989: when I welcomed a brother into my life, and when the events that would shape my political and ideological trajectory for life occurred. Ibukun means Blessing I had grown up for almost seventeen years as the only son. I have four lovely sisters who are dear to me. However, I always longed for a brother for many years. I was doing my A levels at Anwar Ul Islam College Agege in 1987 when my mom became pregnant. By then, it didn’t seem to matter, though somewhere in my heart, I prayed the baby would be a boy like me at last. Momsie's water broke just as I was getting ready for school. Dad dropped me at the Iyana Ipaja bus stop as he took my mom to the same hospital I was born years back. On arriving back home in the evening, I got the news that mo ti r’énikéjì. To say I was elated would

Fieyi @18

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I'd always wanted to be there for when our children would come. However, I was faraway at Maiduguri for the MHWUN delegates conference when the first came (his first nickname -from a delegate- before he formally had a name was Conferencius). So, to say I was delighted at being there on 13 March 2006 would be a great understatement. For the first time, I shared that journey (that's actually an overstatement, no man can truly share that journey, which deepened my respect for women: I told my wife thereafter that if I were a woman, I would not make that journey twice) and the baby was a girl! I'd always loved and wanted to have daughters (happily for me, she is the first of three lovely girls in this Lion's Pride, not counting the lead woman: our General Secretary). Over the years, she has grown to be one of my best friends & a co-conspirator. A fervent feminist, she argues that bride price is a patriarchal practice, each time I jokingly say she and her sisters' do

Nigerians Should Expect More Mass Protests – Baba Aye*

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You are a Co-Convener of the Coalition for Revolution (CORE) that organised peaceful protests across the country for a revolution that was expected to usher in a positive change in the lives of Nigerians. What is the state of CORE and the other affiliates now? The series of peaceful protests you are talking about comprise the #RevolutionNow campaign, which was launched on 5 August 2019 with a nationwide #DayOfRage protest. The campaign helped to catalyse the reawakening of a spirit of revolt against the oppressive rule of the APC in particular and the exploiter ruling class and their repressive apparatus in general. It contributed significantly to igniting the #EndSARS rebellion in October 2020. A lot has happened since, with both the coalition and its affiliates. CORE unfurled the campaign in the wake of a resolution adopted by the African Action Congress (AAC). The Take It Back movement of the AAC, as you know, was a member-organisation of CORE. In fact, it was one of the two blo

Lola: NLC's birthday mate

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Today is yet another day on the calendar with both personal and political significance to me. On this day 20 years ago, the Labour Party (LP) held its Founding Convention, with great hope which I captured in my article for the Labour Factsheet titled “We Have Arrived.” I was elected into the party’s leadership for the first time, with resounding applause. I remember a supposed journalist from a fake newspaper coming up to me to ask a question (I was quite sure he was SSS). His question was why did I get clearly the loudest ovation of those elected even though I emerged as National Auditor, a position that would be considered the least weighty on the NWC? My response was straightforward, I’d spent the better part of my 33 years at the time in selfless service to the working class first as a student activist across three campuses for almost a decade and then for five years as a full-time trade unionist, including as NLC Lagos State Chair (Caretaker Committee) at a crucial point in